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corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
those economies dramatically, weakens those countries. and it also weakens italy. >> you're saying potential contagion. finally, how does it get resolved? michelle is talking about a good bank/bad bank, nobody pays on deposits up to $100,000. the bailout is 10 billion euros from the european -- ecb. the bail-in is about $6 billion euros. so greece is looking for whatever they're looking for, $4 billion, $5 billion. or does europe bail that out even more? >> the biggest factor of all, dan and i were talking a couple minutes ago, the depositors above 100,000 will lose 40% to 50%. >> those are russians. they're going to be pissed off. >> the great systemic problem of giant bank failures is somewhat eliminated by what they're putting forward now. >> what do you think, dan? does this work? >> for our viewers i don't think it matters. the specifics are super interesting, we're going to go have a drink. what matters to people at home, what matters to the larger story is we decided that people's property in banks was not their own. >> in europe or in the u.s., too? >> in europe only. >> th
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
really suffered greatly throughout this week, as we noted. the economy in cyprus, is going to continue to drop. 10 to 20% is likely. this is a country that was glowerrishing before -- fluorishing before it joined eurozone, but now cyprus is taking a hair cut for greece, and greece for cyprus, and the troika is coming in to help. you cannot just jump out at this time. yet there is no room for nail failure, they are not printing more money, they will severe draconian measured. severe austerity, one country at a time, in the meantime people are weeping, imagine everything you have known to be true, is not true any more. neil: if you think about it, ty. you are a big investor, and world renounce, a lot of folks in europe, their bank acount is everything, their savings are there their vestments are in glorifies pass book savings accounts, that is it. so a trust has been broken to say nothing of the trust in european club, to keep it going. i think when you let people down, when you scare them, when you break a trust of confidence it is really katie bar the door, isn't it? >> i don't think t
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
and that will lead to a decline in the money that is slowing around the economy and that means lower output essentially. so what we're looking at here in cyprus is that the retracted recession is not depression. let's continue with the discussion with professor pisteritus. thank you so much for joining us this morning. just how do you read the deal? did the germans win in the end? >> well, i would have to agree with you that what the germans wanted has happened in the end. it's an incredibly bad deal for the eurozone. cyprus is table because you are taking away from the island more than half its gdp. you're destroying small enterprises and the sector which accounted for 45% of gdp. expect unemployment to shoot up. we are not sure what the next step in this model is going to to be, but what has even wider implications is that the for the first time within the eurozone, depositors had to bail out ailing banks. and that happened in the 1930s. there were bank runs. we introduced deposit insurance. we introduced polling schemes for risk. in europe, we are headed for a banking union next year so
in macau's economy. 2013 will look good. melco crown and boyd gaming also a standout. "after the bell" starts right now. david: so here's question, when is it tir moyle actually good for the markets and the economy? well, when it is overseas. renowned professor jeremy siegel telling us why the european crisis could be a win for the u.s. and send the markets soaring to 16,000. liz: protesters are a win for us. we'll fund out more from dr. siegel. we know the feeling standing on the corner waiting for the taxis and being surprised how much that meter ran up while you sat there in the car with traffic. a new company hopes to make that aggravation go away by making taxis obsolete. ceo of sidecar is joining us. david: want to hear about that story coming up. we'll tell you what drove today's markets with today's data download. it is a down day on wall street as investors worry what is next for the eurozone. stocks gave up gains on all three major indices, ending the trading day low. industrials and materials led the decline. well the euro extending its losses against the dollar falling mor
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
home building numbers today too. >> that too. we're in a niche market. the u.s. has had their economy outperform other economies and i think it's a flight to safety relative to the u.s. markets on one hand and it's an unwind from the bond market and risk exposure going forward to rate changes on the other hand. so it's both a flight to safety as well as, you know, what's really going on domestically and people are looking at a twist now with the fed and what their posture will be heading forward. >> i'll be back, adobe earnings at the top of the hour. >> take care, maria. >> what do you think? we're finishing positive here. this market doesn't want to go up? you think some of that's short covering? >> i think that's what we're see right now. finishing up the day. right now people will have to play it cautiously. we haven't seen the end of the cyprus thing. we have some negotiating going on from russia. the impact of that, as you mentioned, is a little minor relative to the size and scope of them, but it's whether or not that moves into italy, spain, as we've all been talking about. >>
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
. let's take a pause to digest all of what's going on. >> there are two economies here. kb homes, lennar, sherwin williams, whirlpool. there is the economy defined by fedex, by caterpillar and this morning by yorele cal. i was on the call last night. the cisco downgrade today. this dichotomy is allowing i think bernanke to not have to taper off. at the same time it calls into question how weak is that international market. seems very weak. >> did we get largely what we wanted from the fed yesterday? there were no big surprises within that. >> no. i think that was the point to not have any big surprises. i think there was a poignant moment yesterday that i think wasn't talked about enough where someone asked imputedly, i felt, because ben bernanke deserves better -- do you know anybody that's unemployed? do you note price of a gallon of milk? he came back, yes, i have a relative on unemployment. he's going to get unemployment down then we'll talk about tapering. until then we are playing a parlor game with the fed. i believe bernanke when he says these things. >> there's no reason to beli
ready for the next hour. bill, good to see you. have a great weekend. by the way, does a bad economy bring euphoria to the walking dead? >> i think it does. >> we'll talk to the creator later. >> that would be her zombie walk there, as she moves on to the next hour of the "closing bell". >> do earnings matter or is it still about the fed? >> it seems like earnings mattered yesterday a little bit. i don't think cyprus was the reason we sold out. are they going to matter going forward? i don't think so. not for the next three months. the fed is still the major factor in this. cyprus isn't a factor yet. earnings aren't a factor. the fed has definitely cleared the -- >> it's about liquidity in this market. >> absolutely. i would like to see more liquidity as far as volume goes. you get an 85-point rally off yesterday's sell-off, small volume, not much of a factor. but cyprus will lead the day monday morning in a short week. >> all right. thank you, matt, very much. all right, we've got a market coming back a little bit. needed to be up 92 to be positive for the week. we're ten points awa
stuart: the highlight reel. all about cyprus. cyprus, they'll out approved. >> the economy is likely to get worse. >> continuation of stealing what has already been stolen. they will not be happy. >> they are devastated. that is not what cyprus is or ever was. >> europe does not have the mechanisms in place that the united states has to manage a currency or a banking system. >> watch the euro. that affects all of us. stuart: italian banks have been halted in trading. charles: yes. stuart: why? charles: they are worried. these stocks are plummeting. stuart: the dutch finance minister said the cyprus situation is a good template for other european countries. they have reached into private bank accounts, taken the money out and used it to finance the bailout. that is what everybody wanted to avoid and now the dow is down 43 points. >> that italian banks are frozen because now the fear is they will have their money taken out. stuart: the dutch minister is now staying this could prompt a euro zone bank restructuring. that is why the dow is now down 46 points. you have a 80-point
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
is a big concern. china is a big concern. they said china's economy is showing symptoms that sparked the crisis in 2008, the warning and saying they risk financial crisis. obviously, concerns about china. i'm going to stick to the cypress theme and put it together. the vix, fear index popped. you see the 1275 right now, up 17%. at one point, up 13%. right now, let's look at the financials because they certainly reacted. in some cases, dramatically, and the idea of them taxing deposits there. citigroup down 2% and banks abroad hit harder. back to you. >> a full and complete report, thank you, nicole. >> for the bailout proposal, is the tax on bank deposits, and that is sparking outrage and fear that there's going to be a run on the banks there. david, chairman and chief investment officer of dumb beer land as visiers of -- cumberland, and why do you think it's a big deal, david? >> caller: well, the finance ministers, the decision has been announced. the cat is out of the bag. once you open the door to taxing a deposit when you have a liquidity crisis, you can never close the door aga
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
good performance of the german economy throughout the year. actually, we are forecasting a growth from around 2% quarter on quarter. and this is on the back of very strong labor markets. >> 2% growth in which quarter? >> basically on average. >> over the year. >> no. for the full year, i would have 11%. but quarter on quarter, up around 2%. why is that? very strong labor market, very strong export. i think more importantly, we should look at next month's bmis. the u.s. data came very strong. we should see a strong performance in germany on the back of the exports. >> you could make that argument on the pmi in germany and it was surprisingly weak. a deep contraction in the fourth quarter was going to rebound now called into question. >> i think this will be the growth. but you've seen in the labor market, you've seen hard data, actually, a strong performance of the economy. so we -- i think we should not expect a continuous increasing pmi, a continuous increase in ifo business index. i think the big question is the next one, in my opinion, just what they said, the u.s. bring very strong
to do it this way, as for 2014, i thi it depends on the circumstances in the economy. if there is more obama fatigue. lou: can i say, watching the republican party with all prevail -- tre veil, i think that everyone better give up on idea of doing anything with the democrats and letting the economy doing the intellectual heavy lifting for the republican party, they better get ready to go. because, this is not going to be a default election, just as 2012 was. i have to -- i hate to do it, but we have to right there. anyway, thank yo thank you very, that is it for us, we hope you will be us tomorrow, congressman frank wolf of join us. on what is going on in the obama justice department, from new york. york. >> you know every liberal's dream that government seizing your money out right, there is nothing you can do about it. now no cyprus they could find out the hard way, this tiny island nation sent a tsunami shockwave to the rest of the world, keeping the banks closed until they find a more palatable way to. welcome i am neil cavuto, you got 10 grand in a bank account. how about waking
companies. real innovative companies popping up. that is what i worry about the u.s. economies. where are those bold innovative companies. and i would make another footnote about the buybacks. yes, record numbers since 2009. but that is because the feds are buying back their own shares. they say let them pass the stress test. they really struggle and diluted earnings per share. diluted their capital base with a lot of shares during the crisis. they have basically flooded the market to recapitalize and buying it back. the. neil: in cyprus explodes and banks reopened, let's see what happens to the residents of cyprus. people say oh, we are there for you. then you realize that they aren't. have a good weekend >> welcome, i am shibani joshi and four gerri willis. we will tackle the new blackberry. as i don't have anything to worry about? we will discover andalk about that as well. and the faa starts to close air traffic control towers. we will tell you how that ca affect your travel plans going into the spring. but first, raising $8.5 billion and euros needed to see the bailout from the e
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
go, the economy comes to lif norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. david: five seconds away. s&p futures are closing let's head back to tim mulholland in the pits of the cme. what are you see, tim? >> we're closing near the highs. slow volume day. next week is the first week of the -- last weeks of the first quarter. so i think that we're looking at some regional fed manufacturing indexes, and end of the quarter. this market sits back a little, one step back, two steps forward. david: everyone wants to it is friday. everybody take a breath. tim, thanks very much. >> sure. shibani: shares of grocery conglomerate supervalu are soaring today. let's head back to the floor of the new york stock exchange and sandra smith with the latest. sandra? >> hey, david, hey, shibani. investors of supervalu the supermarket chain are breathing a fresh air as the stock is trading over 15 million shares. the basically the grocery store chain announced it closed a many could plex deal where cerberus capital management led group slimmed down the supermarket portfolio of this company. they sh
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
crude prices can tell us about the broader economy. stick around. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm joe kernen along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. u.s. equity futures at this hour after giving back about 62, well off the lows yesterday. indicated that a bounce a little, but a time can happen between thou and 9:30 on the east coast. there's energy, you see crude
that the economy is not growing. all wee doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're contracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, aays great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thghts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on e world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it was an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress i now learning th it made serious mistakes. it tried to take the eurozone, the european commission, the international monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how they got in this position. they were reminded of that by the russians who reje
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
economy and creates good jobs that american people need to support their families. we must balance our budget for our students. those who are currently in our universities and community colleges should feel confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, m
of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. but not just by shifting the burden to seniors and disabled as the republicans propose in their fantasy budget. my home state of oregon is the middle of an exciting demonstration of how to squeeze out the waste we all know is there and realign incentives. instead of the empty ritual of pretending to repeal obamacare, let's work together to accelerate reform for all americans. if the oregon experiment works, and frankly many of these efeshencies by the way are already achieved in other parts of the country and with some private health systems, we could save more than $1.2 trillion that is the flawed sequester is suppos
it again. cyprus is only the third smallest economy in the euro zone. if it has to devalue its currency, then do we have a domino fall and a fall in other places, spain, italy, and then do we see the whole thing going over with greece and the rest? >> and impacts us, and people may begin to take some of their money out of stocks here at home. >> what happens, people flee, basically, to quality. the dollar go up and treasuries being bought and see people getting out of risky things such as stocks. >> harris: you're the silver lining person on fox report weekend. you always find it for us and say later on in the week no matter what happens, if we feel a hiccup, if we don't, because of this week and cyprus and european problems over there, we have some good news coming? >> plenty to move the markets this week, and we have news on housing, both on prices and pending home sales and prices across the country and he we also have consumer confidence which has been quite high. so the housing rebound is something that's been pushing the bulls and they have been very resilient. we've seen them run
of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. requesa prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. >> at 22 minutes past the hour, i'm arthel neville with your fox news mine. italian president napolitano has reached out to the leader of italy's democratic party to try to form a new italian government. the eurozone's third largest economy has been politically deadlocked since no party won last month's general election. >>> president obama is in jordan, the final stop on his four-day visit to the middle east for talks with king abdullah wi
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the la
, there will have to be budget cuts behind the sequester. the sequester will not be the end of it, but the economy is recovering. i wouldn't say in spite of what the govern am hment has done. the economy is recovering of its own natural forces now. we've had 12 years of subpar growth. we've had 12 years of up and down with little net progress in the markets and people have forgotten what a strong economy and what a bull market -- a secular bull market looks like, and i think that's generally where we're headed for the next four years, so i'm predicting, as you said, 25,000 on the dow which implies a 15% compound rate of return for the next four years. >> john, can i just come back on the important points that you're making about europe. i'm not sure it's a question of what america trades with whom. it's a question of where the companies that are quoted on this market make their profits and in technology, for example, 40% of those profits are made in europe and therefore europe arguably is more significant than you might think on the trade argument having said that. this is a very interesting week
is going to have some issues as well. and generally speaking the economy is likely to get worse as the conditions of the bailouts are rolled into place, as far as the street scene around here has been concerned and plenty of places taking credit cards and folks are sitting by cafes, and it's greek independence day and they're off and celebrating, not necessarily the bank out, but something indeed. stuart: thanks, rich. by the way people who are so vehement in the treat pstreet p, i believe they're bank employees and they may lose their jobs and their pensions as well and they're left with nothing and why they're so vehement on the streets there. let me go to the dow quickly. the dow is up 48 points that largely on the back of the settlement-- it's not a settlement, it's a bailout. cyprus gets it, up goes the dow, 14,557. all right. our next guest says that cyprus, what happened there, could unravel the entire euro system. economist peter morici joins us now, all right, peter. you've said this morning, i've read the article, that cyprus will be better off getting out of the euro
states' economy -- housing is uniquely american. a lot of building products go into homes made right here. think about all the people who touch a home and away from its permit to its sale, builders, laborers, people who make piping, windows, doors, stoves, air conditioning, sinks, toilets, showers, baths, and, of course, electric and plumbing. then there's all the white collar jobs, the banks, sales, lawyers, they all get paid. and the retailers who need to make the place great. to me we will look back on this moment and recognize that while the whoever republican do you say rules imposed on the cypriots certainly damaged confidence in europe and the euro once again, what actually might have mattered in america is that the housing boom was picking up steam at the same time. i know, stupid. brilliant! so what am i asking for here. i'm trying not to be too positive or negative. but i'm definitely playing the skeptic. i worry about what i know and even worry about what i don't know. but most important, i want to emphasize what could drive the market either way. and the bottom line is, i thin
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